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13 posts from November 2011

11/30/2011

Breaking language and culture barriers at the Festival de Cine

This post is by Yvonne Marquez, a magazine journalism major from the University of Texas at Austin. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Communication, New Media and Journalism program at the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

One of the perks of being part of the Communication, New Media and Journalism program is being immersed in the local contemporary arts culture. In other words, we get to do really cool things like get student passes to the Sevilla Festival de Cine Europeo, which showcased the best European films this year.

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Moviegoers in line for tickets to Festival de Cine Europeo at Nervion Plaza. 

Continue reading "Breaking language and culture barriers at the Festival de Cine" »

11/28/2011

Video: How to snag a bag of convent pastries

This video blog is by Mary Stephens, a telecommunications major at Indiana University. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Language and Society program at the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

Wondering where the CIEE students in the Palacio are getting those delicious looking bags of pastries? San Leandro is a convent in Sevilla where you can enjoy the freshest pastries every day. Watch this video to find out exactly how to order (the video was filmed at a different convent in Granada on a weekend excursion with the CIEE Language and Society group).

How to get to San Leandro from the Palacio (four-minute walk): Head right out of the CIEE palacio, turn right on Calle Cabeza del Rey Don Pedro, turn right on Calle de los Boteros and Left on Calle Zamudio. You will see a sign for Convento de San Leandro in the Plaza de Ildefonso. 

11/25/2011

A crash course on making Spanish friends

This post is by Sheila Bushman, an economics major at the University of Virginia. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Advanced Liberal Arts program through the CIEE Study Center in Seville. She is directly enrolled in classes with Spanish students at the Universidad de Sevilla.

Despite the fact that you are in classes with Spanish students, have an intercambio—a Spaniard with whom you theoretically meet every week to converse for an hour in Spanish and an hour in English—and have tutors of various kinds, it can still be difficult to befriend Spaniards.

Why? Not because they are unfriendly. The sevillanos are some of the friendliest people I have ever met. But they already know each other; they belong to tight-knit groups of friends and have been taking classes together for years.

You are the newcomer who needs friends. Yup, this one’s on you. It’s definitely a daunting task, but I can also assure you that it’s a worthwhile one. As one of my professors once put it: What’s the worst that can happen when you ask someone to hang out? They say no. Which isn’t any worse than not asking at all. And chances are, they will say yes, which is infinitely better than not asking at all.

Continue reading "A crash course on making Spanish friends" »

11/23/2011

Una visita fotográfico de la lluviosa Ronda

This post is by Hannah Boeck, an english and history major from Concordia University. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Language and Society program at the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

Ronda, Andalucía
Hace unas semanas, mi amiga y yo fuimos a Ronda dos días. La ciudad está aproximadamente a dos horas del sur-este de Sevilla en autobús. Fue una de las ciudades favoritas del autor Ernest Hemingway y el director de cine Orson Welles.

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11/21/2011

Everyday history lessons around Seville

This post is by Bess Stanisz, a psychology and sociology major at the University of Colorado at Boulder. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Language and Society program at the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

Giralda of Sevilla
The Giralda in Sevilla

I’ve realized since arriving to Sevilla that this city is built around preserved historical sites. Sometimes the modern luxuries contrast greatly with the architecture, and other times the history is disguised by the modern.

The cathedral is the most obvious example of contrasting modern with historical in the city. After class some days I like to sit outside at a bar or café on Avenida de la Constitución, the street in front of the cathedral, and observe the people and geography around me. I find it amazing and slightly ironic that a light rail runs directly in front of the world’s largest gothic cathedral, which was constructed in the sixteenth century!

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11/18/2011

Best decision in Spain... a business internship?

This post is by Tuanny Soares Martins, a marketing and global perspectives major at Bentley University. During the fall 2011 semester she is paticipating in the CIEE Business and Society program.

If you ask me about the most exciting experience I had in Spain that pushed me out of my comfort  zone, I would have to say my business internship, without a doubt!

I have to admit that if you asked before I came to Spain if this was what I expected, the answer would have been a definite no. I was caught by surprise and ended up learning quite a few things, but first let me tell you how this all started.

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11/16/2011

Los mercados de Sevilla

This post is by Liz Crumpacker, a media studies and Spanish major at Scripps College. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Advanced Liberal Arts program through the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

Sevilla es una ciudad reconocida por muchos edificios increíbles y únicos. Como ejemplo podemos pensar en la Catedral, la Giralda,  la Plaza de España y el Real Alcázar, entre otros.

Aunque me encanta todos los monumentos famosos que Sevilla ofrece, me he dado cuenta que la ciudad tiene muchos tesoros que no necesariamente atraen a los turistas, pero se puede asistir a ellos para sentirse un ciudadano sevillano. Hay dos mercados en particular que he visitado y me han encantado, uno de antigüedades y otro de arte.

El mercado de antigüedades se llama “El Jueves” ya que se realiza cada semana los jueves por la mañana. Es el mercado del aire libre más antiguo de Sevilla que empezó en el siglo XIII, y toma lugar en la calle Feria cerca del Metropol Parasol.

Mercado Juevez
Azulejos en el mercado El Jueves

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11/15/2011

VIDEO: Esto no se para

This video was created in collaboration with students from the Cultura en la Calle interest group for the CIEE Liberal Arts program and CIEE staff.

He aquí un pequeño gran trabajo de los estudiantes del Grupo de Interés “Cultura en la Calle.” En un tiempo record, tanto en la preparación y ensayo como en la interpretación (el rodaje completo se hizo en una sola mañana), los estudiantes han conseguido trasmitir en no más de cuatro minutos una atmósfera de buena energía, entusiasmo y creatividad.

El hilo conductor de la historia es una carta que reciben casi de “casualidad” donde pueden leer “Esto no se para,” en alusión no sólo a su experiencia personal estudiando en el extranjero, sino a un nivel más amplio, el ritmo continuo y vital, el mundo, el universo... nunca se para!

11/14/2011

The other side of the desk: from Spanish student to English teacher

This post is by Devon Shaw, a Hispanic studies, education and sociology major at the College of William & Mary. During the 2011-2012 academic year he is participating in the Teaching Development program at the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

After two months of living in Seville, this week marks a turning point in my study abroad experience. I’m halfway through the semester and have just finished my midterm exams.

In the past eight weeks I have become well acquainted with this beautiful city and its equally astounding neighbors. My taste buds have reveled in the delights of home Spanish cooking and my body has become accustomed to the relaxing pastime that (most of) the world knows as siesta. But what makes my experience so unique, so entirely different from the others, is that I begin teaching my own English classes next week.

Twice a week for the past five weeks, I have spent two hours at a local colegio (school), observing English classes, collaborating on various activities with the teacher and getting to know fifty 14- and 15-year-olds. I’ve shared with them American football, Tiger Woods and the correct uses of the past simple and past continuous.

Between classes I talk with the other teachers and learn about the school system here in Spain. Some of them like to practice their English with me and I am always practicing my Spanish. My time in the school has enabled me to develop a deeper understanding of how schools in this country function and the roles of teachers and students in Spain’s educational system.

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The Teaching Development group, from left: Devon Shaw, Nereida Martinez, the director of the Instituto Libre in Morocco, Luis Recio, Haley Winters, and Samantha Jasinski

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11/11/2011

Salto y doma: My attempt at riding in Spain

This post is by Katy George, a journalism and Spanish major at the University of Oregon. During the fall 2011 semester she is participating in the Communication, New Media and Journalism program at the CIEE Study Center in Seville.

One of the horses at la Escuela de Equitacion la Pentagrama
One of the horses at la Escuela de Equitación la Pentagrama

It’s a Thursday. I’m huddled behind a section of rock wall, using the solid mass to shield myself from the wind. My scarf is wrapped around my head like a hijab and I’m willing the thin material to turn waterproof against the pouring rain. In the arena’s soupy mess of sand, a man with a striking resemblance to Geraldo Rivera shouts over the din of the storm at a line of children on horseback.

¡Baja las manos!” he shouts at a preteen whose death-grip on the reins is causing her horse to panic. “¡Baja las manos!” His mustache drips with rainwater in spite of his wide-brimmed safari hat. His horse stamps impatiently, ready to get out of the awful weather. 

How did I ever manage to get into this situation?

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