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12 posts from June 2011

06/28/2011

FUNDAMENTAL TIPS TO ENHANCE YOUR EXPERIENCE

Summer Internship

 

Name: Kyle
CIEE Seville: Summer Internship Program
Semester: Summer 2011
Home School:  Indiana University

 

To anyone and everyone who decides to visit Seville, here’s a short list of my fundamental tips to help enhance your experience abroad:

  • Always speak in Spanish.  It’s the only way you’re going to improve.  Believe me, it gets easier!  Actively think in Spanish, watch Spanish shows/movies, and speak with Spaniards.  In less than a month, you’ll be able to converse with anyone.  Remember: the only way to improve your Spanish skills is through practice.
  • Converse with the locals and truly learn Spain’s Spanish!  Believe me, it’s worlds different from the Mexican Spanish I learned in school - the lingo, the expressions, and the accent are all so different (but so awesome)!
  • Try all of the food, no matter how different it may look!  I guarantee you’ll like something you never thought you’d try.  Personal favorite discovery: gazpacho.  I’m truly obsessed.
  • Appreciate the siestas!  The workday allows for a couple of hours in the middle of the day to not only hide from the heat, but to also eat lunch and nap.  Perfect, right?
  • Explore!  Hit all of the main tourist attractions in the first week (the Cathedral and Plaza de España are very popular), but also make sure to explore the city on your own.  You may find your own personal paradise in the middle of the city.

3

                            Gathering at the Plaza de Torros for the bullfight.  Little did I know…

Continue reading "FUNDAMENTAL TIPS TO ENHANCE YOUR EXPERIENCE " »

06/21/2011

Charise

    

    Name: Charise M.
    Home School: Penn State University
    Nationality: American

 

 

For class, we were broken up into groups and assigned a group leader. Our leader was Nacho, who has become one of my good friends. He was kind enough to invite our group to his house to show us his town, introduce us to his family, and swim in his pool! We spent a lovely afternoon at his house after class and we plan on returning soon! 

Actividad Nacho

With my "intercambio", we have been meeting each week speaking in both Spanish and English. It has been great having a Spanish friend who wants to talk to you and wants to help you improve. They have been very patient with us and enjoy our company. This week we are planning on going to a Spanish play together, which was set up through CIEE. I hope to stay in contact with my intercambio, so that when I return home, I can maintain my Spanish!

Intercambio

06/20/2011

 

     Lucy song
    

 

    Name: Lucy S.
    Home School: Penn State University
    Nationality: American

 

On the way home from Morocco yesterday [will post about trip later], I awoke from my nap to a quiet bus, and as I gazed out the window at the sun setting over beautiful green plains of the Spanish countryside, I felt so peaceful and at home. And as I sat there, I had a revelation: I want to make a life for myself in Spain. Although I'm only here for two months, I want to live as though I'll be here for 2 years and not treat this experience as though it were a vacation. And this starts largely with detaching myself from an American things and embracing the unfamiliar. In my 12 days here so far, my Spanish has improved a lot and I've talked to many Spaniards. I've had an amazing time, but I realized that I still don't really know that much about Spanish culture. I know surface level things like how they have siesta and I learned a bit about college students' views on society from this survey I did for Spanish class, but there are so soso many more things I don't understand at all--like how they view Americans, their hopes and dreams, the types of things they do with friends, how much they study, and on and on and on. I'm sure that there are many answers to all these questions and maybe you can't generalize answers. Or maybe if you do generalize answers, they would end up being similar to young people all around the world. Or maybe they're not really that different from my friends and I in the US.  All I am certain of is that I can't answer any of these questions about one single person here.

Coming here with such a large group of American students is comforting and provides a great support system, but I don't want to rely on them. I'm not here to make American friends--I can do that anywhere in America. I'm here to really throw myself into Spanish society and learn as much as I can about them in a short two months. My plan of action is mainly to venture alone into everyday Spanish life more. I want to meet students not at bars and clubs, but at school, volunteering, and church. I'm going to try to go to the University a couple times a week to do my homework, and when I need help, I'll ask the Spaniards. This will not only help me learn Spanish, but also provides and excuse to talk to and hopefully befriend Spanish college students. And not going to lie--I wouldn't mind meeting some cute Spanish guy. Also, since volunteering is such a big part of my life normally, I want to do it here too. I would love to be an English or Chinese tutor (maybe through the University?) or maybe even work at some sort of daycare (or both). And I also really want to attend Church to see what it's like in Spain (both Catholic and Protestant). This will be a little harder though because I only have 3 Sundays left since I'm traveling many of the weekends. I will also try to read Spanish books, listen mostly to Spanish music, and watch only Spanish TV.

To clarify, while I really want to spend more time with Spanish people, I'm not going to sever ties with my American friends here or anything. I just want to rebalance my priorities and spend less time with Americans. I'll already see them everyday during class and on weekends during travel so I don't need to go out with them every night. That's one more point that I wanted to emphasize: at the beginning of this trip, Emily told me that her sister's one regret from studying abroad was not going out enough. I realized that that would never be my regret. My regret would only be that I didn't spend enough time with Spanish people and didn't learn enough about Spanish culture. And with that, I now know what's most important to me.


LO QUE HE APRENDIDO EN SEVILLE (What I’ve Learned in Seville!) - Interning with a Spanish company

Summer Internship


 

 

Name: Kyle
CIEE Seville: Summer Internship Program
Semester: Summer 2011
Home School:  Indiana University

As a business major, I’m always told that the world is becoming increasingly more global. Every day, it’s more important to understand how firms operate in different countries.  Through my internship experience, I’ve learned so much about the Spanish business environment.

Continue reading "LO QUE HE APRENDIDO EN SEVILLE (What I’ve Learned in Seville!) - Interning with a Spanish company" »

Living in Spain

Summer Internship

 

Name: Brenda
CIEE Seville: Summer Internship Program
Semester: Summer 2011
Home School:  University of Illinois at Chicago

Mi experiencia en España ha sido muy interesante. Nunca ha tenido una oportunidad de viajar a otro país a practicar mi español. Siempre ha hablado en español pero me faltaba mejorarlo ya que nunca tome clases en español. Muchos de mis experiencias aquí han cambiando mi modo de pensar y de ser. Mi familia española, mi práctica, y mi programa de CIEE son factores en mi mejoramiento.

Continue reading "Living in Spain" »

LO QUE HE APRENDIDO EN SEVILLE (What I’ve Learned in Seville!) - Living with a host family

Summer Intenship

 

 Name: Kyle
CIEE Seville: Summer Internship Program
Semester: Summer 2011
Home School:  Indiana University

I arrived in the beautiful city of Seville having few expectations.  I figured I would marginally improve my Spanish skills, learn about Spain’s economy in class, and get a quick and dirty overview of Spanish businesses in my internship.  WOW, was I wrong!  Not only has this experience completely exceeded the minimal expectations I set, but I’ve also learned more in one month here than I ever could have imagined!

(Preface:  this is the first time I’ve written something longer than a paragraph in English in a month, so pardon any/all phrases that don’t seem “natural” - my mind is struggling to switch back and forth between English and Spanish.  This is a good thing!)

Continue reading "LO QUE HE APRENDIDO EN SEVILLE (What I’ve Learned in Seville!) - Living with a host family" »

06/17/2011

Marruecos

McClure, Charise

    Name: Charise M.
    Home School: Penn State University
    Nationality: American

 

A few weeks ago, about 20 of us CIEE students went on a weekend excursion to Morocco, Africa with a travel agency. It was quite an experience! This picture is a picture of our Moroccan tour guide who took us through a completely blue city. All of the walls of each building are painted blue to keep the bugs away. From trying new food to riding on camels, it was an overall great experience that would be impossible to forget.

Foto marruecos



06/14/2011

actividades entre semana

Dani
Name
Daniel G

Home School: Universidad de Sevilla 
Nationality: Español/Sevillano

 

Durante las ultimas semanas los estudiantes de CIEE han podido disfrutar de una serie de actividades en las que han conocido numerosos aspectos de la ciudad, algunos de ellos que se escapan al habitual recorrido turístico.

La primera de las actividades fue la visita a la Feria del Libro de Sevilla. La feria, una de las mas importantes del país, fue el lugar mas idóneo para que compraran libros en español con la idea de poder mejorar el idioma. Tras esto y después de un breve paseo por la zona monumental, nos tomamos un helado mientras hablamos de cuales habían sido las primeras impresiones en su nueva ciudad.

IMG_0681

Otra de las actividades fue la visita al nuevo icono turístico de Sevilla, el Metropol Parasol. Desde lo mas alto de la estructura se puede disfrutar de unas vistas inéditas de la ciudad, lugar desde el que los estudiantes realizaron numerosas fotos. El contraste entre la zona antigua (casco histórico) y las modernas construcciones del 92 (Cartuja) fue una de las cosas que mas les llamó la atención. 

IMG_0726

Por ultimo, y dado que Sevilla es una de las cunas del Flamenco, visitamos “La Carboneria”, uno de los locales mas emblemáticos de la ciudad. Alli pudieron disfrutar de un espectáculo de Flamenco en vivo. Sin duda una de las actividades que mas entusiasmó a los estudiantes.

06/10/2011

Labyrinths y La Catedral

Lucy Song

 

 

    Name: Lucy S.
    Home School: Penn State University
    Nationality: American

 

 

I am. So. EXHAUSTED!! I left at 9:30 this morning to go to class and was out all day till just now (6:45pm), and I have to leave again in 15 minutes. Since we walk everywhere, it takes a long time to go everywhere and on my way home, my feet are always killing me! I love Sevilla though, I'm already starting to get a sense of the city, and sometimes I can go home without getting lost!! Haha, it sounds bad, but that's actually kind of impressive. This city is just so crazy because there are no straight streets and clear-cut intersections. You can't really say "take the second left and then the first right" because there are probably 3 lefts and 2 rights spread out over a plaza. Also, their street signs are written on buildings rather than on posts at intersections like ours; they are typically at the ends of streets so if your intersection hits the middle of a street, sometimes you can't even tell what street it is. Before I came here, I thought I had a good sense of direction, but boy is this place hard to navigate.


           We had a tour of the Catedral and Giralda today and the view of Sevilla was so beautiful from La Giralda (the famous tower of the cathedral). The Catedral in Sevilla is the 3rd largest cathedral in the world and it took 400 years to build so there are all sorts of architectural styles inside, it's really cool. From the top of the tower, you can see the whole city. The main part of Sevilla (El Centro) really isn't that big, you can probably walk from one side to the other within 45 minutes. Last summer, I thought that I walked a lot in Tokyo, but we also took the the train a lot to different parts of the city. Here however, we literally walk everywhere.

  View from the towerView from the tower

          After the Catedral, Ginny and I went to the Universidad de Sevilla to interview some Spanish students for our Spanish class and it was so much fun! I was apprehensive at first, but all the students were really friendly and I loved talking to them! I was also really impressed with myself that I could actually understand most of what they were saying! Then on the way home Ginny and I talked completely in Spanish. I have improved so immensely in just the past few days, it's amazing. I really hope that I can become almost fluent by the time I go home! And it's SO much fun to talk in Spanish!

06/02/2011

Orientation

Lucy Song

 

 

    Name: Lucy S.
    Home School: Penn State University
    Nationality: American

 

 

 

Our first night in Sevilla, we had dinner with our Orientation groups (Grupo 6 for me!), and since then, we basically spent our entire 2.5 days of orientation with our groups and really became close with each other. I was surprised at how quickly we went from all trying to meet each other to forming cliques and groups of some sorts. Our orientation groups were split by the amount of time we were staying, which is awesome because now my good friends are all staying here for 9 weeks. This experience really reminded me of how people become closest with their hall mates from freshman year. Since we were always together, we just naturally got to know each other better and formed our friend groups that way. Other than that, we also started to get to know people in our living areas since we walk everywhere together.

Grupo 6
Our orientation group leader was Roberto (aka RUCHI, tha man in blue in the picture above) and he is absolutely awesome. He's so sweet and funny though and our entire group just adores him. It's so cute when he speaks English and he also jokes around with us a lot. We call him Ruchi because when Steve affectionately tried to call him Bobby, he told us that his real nickname was Ruchi. During those first days, he took us all around the city, to CIEE info sessions, and out for all our meals. We went out for tapas a bunch and they were soooo good. But if I ate like that everyday, I would blow up like a pig. In the beginning, we didn't understand anything on the menu so we just asked Ruchi to order for us, but everything was so delicious.